Memorials to Fallen K-9s
 2006 page 03
The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.

Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below
 
 
In Loving Memory of
K-9 ANGUS
December 7, 2005

Partner: P.O. Nick Tartaglione
Briarcliff Police Department 
507 North State Road
Briarcliff, NY 10510
(914) 762-6007
fax (914) 762-6900
topd@OssiningTownPolice.com
submitted by Nick
Angus was almost 12. He retired 4 years ago.
  but still every bit my partner. 
He died of a cancerous tumor and was put down in my arms. 
A part of my heart is gone, but I'll get it back one day.
 One day we will be side by side again. 
Until that day comes,   I'll carry him inside my heart. 
A day will not pass that I will not whisper his name, 
and remember what it feels like to have him at my side. 
Thank you, Angus for everything.
I love you gusser!

Nick

Guardians of the night.....
In Loving Memory of 
K-9 ZEUS
January 23, 2006 

Partner: Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA
Waterford, CT

A special thank you for all of you all over the country who supported our family in this time of sorrow. There were many cards and emails received along with some very special gifts, especially from Lulu & Bob Krause. Thanks again to all.

submitted by Jim

 Eastwick's Zeus Von Marquis
April 10, 2002  -  March 23, 2006
K-9 Zeus was loyal, devoted, trusting, obedient, highly intelligent, creative, talented, protective but discriminating, friendly to friends, but observant of strangers and wary of unusual behavior. He reacted when the situation called for it. He was wise, perceptive, personable and had a great sense of humor. He was sensitive and caring, expressive and demonstrative of his thoughts and feelings. He wanted to be with me 26 hours a day… even if there are only 24. But he took what he could get, and let you know if it isn't enough. You could never hide your feelings from Zeus, he saw right through you and couldn't fool him. To be apart from our beloved family was to find him in sorrow. There is no other dog who is more "human-like". I often said he was a person in a dog suit. I gave 100 percent and in return he gave me 110 percent.
I knew from the start when I took you home from the breeder you were going to be special.  That week when I took you to the fireworks at 8 weeks old and the noise or the flashes didn't even phase you. At five months old you were doing everything in obedience with hand signals at 100 yards. I will always remember your favorite toy, the laser light. We would shine the light for a second on the floor and Zeus would make the whole family laugh because for the next hour you would be looking every where for it........under chairs, tables, doors & ceilings. And I would always have to hide my key ring because you knew the laser light was attached to it and if I was not around you would grab the keys and turn the light on your self.  If you knew the light was in my pocket you would constantly nudge me and try to get your nose in my pocket. When ever we went for a ride you where always looking out the front windshield with your head on my shoulder and at nights watching TV you would place your head in one of our family's laps just to get your ears rubbed. You were 92 lbs of solid muscle and nerves of steel that never backed down. Our family's sorrow is, we lost you at such a young age, only 3 years old. I will miss you as a loyal & faithful partner, my wife Gail will miss you for your antics and my son Troy will miss his wrestling partner. There will never be another to fill your paws, but you already knew that. 
And I would like to give a special thank you to Fran Diano for introducing our family to Zeus.  I remember contacting Fran to see if see had a litter of pups and was told she just bred her Doberman that day.  I had to wait 18 weeks for our Zeus but it was definitely worth the wait. Zeus was not just a dog. He is a spirit placed on this earth to watch over our family, to teach us humility, kindness, and devotion, and it was our privilege to share our lives with him. I guess the man upstairs needed you more than we did to watch the gates upstairs.......till we meet again stay good !
In Loving Memory of 
K-9 ZEUS
July 24, 1997 ~January 24, 2006 

Partner: Officer Gary Garrison
Warwick Township Police Department
315 Clay RoadLititz, PA 17543717 626.3162


  Gary carrying K9 Zeus

Officer Gary Garrison from Warwick Township Police Department in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, I wanted to pass on that my Police K-9 has passed on.  K-9 Zeus was born in July 24,1997 and move on to rest on January 24, 2006. He will be remembered for his incredible size, presence and numerous deployments where he located loads of narcotics, missing children, and fleeing supects.  Thank you to you for all you do. K-9 Zeus will forever remembered.  You can see a picture of K-9 Aiko at www.warwicktownship.org. K-9 Alko is my present partner after Zeus retired. 
Zeus became a member of the Warwick Township Police Department in October of 1999 after becoming certified as a certified Patrol/Utility dog from Castles K-9 training academy.  Zeus is a Czechoslovakian German Shepard.  Zeus is trained in Obedience, Agility, Criminal Apprehension, Narcotic, Article Area, and Building searches.  In his spare time he enjoys playing fetch with a tennis ball and playing with Trigger, his older but smaller Jack Russell Terrier "brother".
"It's not the wolf that makes the pack, it's the pack that makes the wolf.  Be a team player!!  "

Officer Gary Garrison

The Warwick Township Police Department, in a joint effort with the Lititz Borough Police Department and through the generosity of our residents and local businesses, was able to create a K-9 team in the fall of 1999. 
In addition to routine patrol, the team has been involved in numerous search operations, have assisted in several tactical operations - often putting themselves in harm's way - and have been a great success providing demonstrations and learning opportunities at local schools, service clubs, youth groups and special events. 
If you would like the Warwick Township K-9 team to provide a demonstration at your business or school, or if you would like additional information, you may either send an e-mail to Officer Garrison, or call the Warwick Township Police Department at (717) 626-3162. 

*********

In Loving Memory of
  P.D. K-9 NITRO
January 23, 2006

Partner: Cst. Howard Rutter

Vancouver Police Department
312 Main Street, Vancouver, BC
Canada - V6A 2T2
headquarters: 2120 Cambie Street,
Vancouver, BC Canada ` V5Z 4N6

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA  & Cst. Steve Kaye

 
VPD loses a long time K9 in the line of duty
Vancouver Police are mourning the loss of one of their canine members.
The dog ‘Nitro’ was killed Monday night while trying to catch a couple of car thieves.  He caught up to the pair as they jumped onto a freight train in New Westminster.  Nitro grabbed one of the men, but slipped and was run over by the train. Constable Tim Fanning says the dog will be missed. “Very sad, very sad, but he went out in a hail of glory,” Fanning said. Nitro had been on the force for nine years and was due to retire shortly and live with it's handler.

*************************
VANCOUVER - A second person has been charged in connection with the foot chase which resulted in the death of Vancouver Police dog ‘Nitro’.   Nitro was killed last week after being struck by a train while chasing two alleged car thieves.
One of the two suspects, 26 year old Greg Pete was arrested a short time after the incident, but the second suspect got away.However, last night police found and arrested Pete’s younger brother, 24 year old Jeremy Pete.Vancouver Police allege Jeremy Pete was the suspect who jumped onto a moving box car, causing nitro to fall under the train to his death. Both men are facing a variety of charges. A formal ceremony in honour of Nitro is set for next week.
NITRO
Breed: German Shepherd
Weight: 35 Kgs.
Sex: Male
Colour: sable
Born: August 1997
K-9 Cerified: 99-06-09

Nitro is your friend and says: "No matter what a stranger tells you NEVER get into a car with someone you don't know."Nitro is two years old and has been recently certified as a police dog. He is looking forward to a long career protecting you and capturing bad guys. Nitro loves to play ball and spend time at home with his family. 

 
Nitro's service:
Barks, yips and howls punctuate police dog funeral in Vancouver
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Hundreds of police officers stood at attention as a funeral for one of their own was punctuated by howls and yips.  A cacophony of barking arose Monday as 92 police dog teams paraded past a shrine and urn containing the ashes of Nitro, a German shepherd that died in the line of duty two weeks earlier. Nitro's handler, Constable Howard Rutter and his wife Carolyn, son Matthew and daughter Megan sat in the front row in Seaforth Armouries and fought back tears for much of the 70 minute service, which included three eulogies and a multimedia production on an overhead screen. "There were so many times that I would be frustrated with Nitro and get mad at him, but all it took was him coming over and licking my face and all would be well again," Rutter wrote in a full-color printed tribute to police service dog No. 9755.
The funeral was preceded by a motorcade of 60 police vehicles with lights flashing. Many of the dog teams in attendance were from police agencies in neighboring Washington state, including Seattle, Everett, Yakima and Monroe, Nitro's birthplace. Nitro, 8 1/2, a Vancouver police dog since 1999, died after lunging to grab a man sought for investigation of automobile theft, losing his grip and falling under the wheels of a train. By Sunday 185 messages of condolences had been posted on a police Web page set up for the dog.  The man Nitro grabbed, Greg Daniel Pete, 26, was arrested and charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000. In keeping with Vancouver police tradition, Nitro's ashes will be spread on each of the four corners of the city, so he can guard Vancouver even in his afterlife. (submitted by Annelabs@aol.com )
Car thief handed 10 months in case that killed Nitro
Loss of dog not part of sentence, judge says6/23/06
VANCOUVER -- A petty criminal whose name is now known to just about every police officer in the city was sentenced this week to one day in jail, plus credit for time served, for stealing a Honda Civic last January. 
Because the courts give double credit for time spent in custody, in effect Gregg Daniel Pete, who was in jail for five months before trial, got 10 months for stealing a car.
In a city where nightclub shootings, street-racing fatalities, kidnappings and home invasions grab the headlines, Mr. Pete's crime and punishment would have probably gone unnoticed -- except for the fact that a beloved police dog died on the case.
Vancouver Police Department spokesman Constable Howard Chow declined to comment on Mr. Pete's sentence yesterday, except to say that it brought some closure to a file that upset a lot of police officers.  Nitro, a nine-year-old German shepherd who received his Vancouver Police Department badge in 1999, was killed when he slipped from a moving train as he pursued Mr. Pete and another man.  Last Jan. 23, Mr. Pete, 26, was spotted in a Honda Civic that had been reported stolen a few days earlier. While an unmarked car tracked the vehicle, dog handler Constable Howard Rutter and his assistant, Nitro, were called in for backup. Then the car thieves realized they were being followed and sped off through the streets until their car was trapped at a rail crossing in New Westminster.  "When a train blocked their escape route, they jumped out of the car and ran. Police dog Nitro was released and began chasing one of the men, who jumped up on the train. Nitro latched onto him, but the train began moving and he lost his grip. He was sucked under the train and died," a Vancouver Police account of the incident said.  Mr. Pete was arrested at the scene. For days after, the shock of Nitro's death rippled through the police department.  A ceremony to mark the dog's death drew 700 mourners, with police, many of them dog handlers, coming to Vancouver from across British Columbia, Washington State and even Ontario.  "We lost one of our own. He wasn't just a dog. He was a loyal and dedicated member of the department and he had a police identification number to prove it," Inspector Dean Robinson said at the ceremony.  "Some day we'll see him again, and I promise on that day, we'll play ball," said an emotional Constable Rutter.  Constable Rutter has taken a position in administration with the dog squad, where he is helping with training. He hasn't been assigned a new dog.  Peter Stabler, the Crown counsel, said the judge did not hold the death of Nitro against Mr. Pete when it came to sentencing.
"The judge said that as much as a concern [as] that was, he didn't take it into account on sentencing because there was no intent, by whoever the dog chased, to do anything to the dog. They were just running away . . . which is I think correct," Mr. Stabler said.
Although Nitro is dead, and the last criminal he pursued has served his time, the dog may have left a lasting legacy in the city. Shortly after his death, Vancouver council approved a $1.65-million plan to build a 370-square-metre dog squad facility.

 
 
 



Vancouver police dog mourned   -  Jan 25 2006
A Vancouver police dog was killed on Monday night while trying to stop a suspect who had jumped onto a moving rail car.  Nitro, an eight-year-old German Shepherd, had been with the police department since 1999, always with the same handler, Const. Howard Rutter.   On Monday evening, they began a pursuit of a stolen car in East Vancouver – following the vehicle along Marine Drive into New Westminster.   They caught up with the stolen car near a rail line, where traffic had stopped for a train.   The two suspects ended up fleeing on foot, with Rutter and Nitro still in pursuit. One of the men saw the dog closing in on him and jumped up onto the side of a stationery box car. The dog jumped up after him and got a grip on the man's leg. The train then started to move, and Nitro lost his grip and fell to his death under its wheels .  The two suspects managed to get away. But one man was taken into custody a few hours later.  Nitro and Const. Howard Rutter take part in a training exercise.(Courtesy: Clay Stang/VPD)  26 year-old Gregg Daniel Pete of Vancouver has been charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000.   Police are still looking for the second man.  Nitro is featured in an ICBC auto theft poster campaign, which begins next month. He was also the first police dog named in the police department's "name the puppy" contest.  Police spokesperson Const. Howard Chow says the department is planning a public memorial event at a local armoury next month.  The Vancouver Police Department has 16 dogs. Nitro was the seventh to die in the line of duty since the gog squad was formed in 1957. 
***************************
 

Barks, yips and howls punctuate police dog funeral in Vancouver
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ` Tuesday, February 7, 2006
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Hundreds of police officers stood at attention as a funeral for one of their own was punctuated by howls and yips.  A cacophony of barking arose Monday as 92 police dog teams they paraded past a shrine and urn containing the ashes of Nitro, a German shepherd that died in the line of duty two weeks earlier.  Nitro's handler, Constable Howard Rutter and his wife Carolyn, son Matthew and daughter Megan sat in the front row in Seaforth Armouries and fought back tears for much of the 70-minute service, which included three eulogies and a multimedia production on an overhead screen. "There were so many times that I would be frustrated with Nitro and get mad at him, but all it took was him coming over and licking my face and all would be well again," Rutter wrote in a full-color printed tribute to police service dog No. 9755.
The funeral was preceded by a motorcade of 60 police vehicles with lights flashing. Many of the dog teams in attendance were from police agencies in neighboring Washington state, including Seattle, Everett, Yakima and Monroe, Nitro's birthplace.  Nitro, 8 1/2, a Vancouver police dog since 1999, died after lunging to grab a man sought for investigation of automobile theft, losing his grip and falling under the wheels of a train. By Sunday 185 messages of condolences had been posted on a police Web page set up for the dog. The man Nitro grabbed, Greg Daniel Pete, 26, was arrested and charged with possession of stolen property over $5,000.  In keeping with Vancouver Police tradition, Nitro's ashes will be spread on each of the four corners of the city, so he can guard Vancouver even in his afterlife.
****************
Canine colleagues gather to honour Nitro's courage
PETTI FONG   VANCOUVER -- It began with a lone howl. 
Then down the line of cars, dogs leaned out the windows to listen and the barking began. Canine units from the United States and British Columbia proceeded through downtown Vancouver yesterday, as dogs howled in the backseat on their way to the Seaforth Armoury, to mourn the death of police dog Nitro. The police canine died in the line of duty Jan. 23. 
Nitro was set to retire this spring after developing arthritis in his elbows. But that didn't slow the German shepherd down as he chased two accused car thieves who jumped on a train in New Westminster. 
When the train began moving, eight-year-old Nitro slipped under the wheels and was instantly killed.  Vancouver's police department hadn't expected Nitro's death to hit the public so hard.  Mourners from as far away as Britain began sending hundreds of e-mails and sympathy cards to the department. Nitro's death inspired some to write poetry and make crafts, such as wooden urns for the dog's handler, Constable Howard Rutter.  Others remembered beloved pets, posting pictures of their own dogs on the message board. It was all a bit too much for one Vancouver newspaper columnist, who wrote that mourners were descending into emotional quicksand when they began comparing Nitro to a human being.
In response, Sergeant Mark Tonner made what he called a bold statement: that he is convinced all dogs go to heaven. "Yes, I said it," Sgt. Tonner wrote. "Does that mean Nitro is chasing bad guys through sunny meadows, young and arthritis-free?" No, Sgt. Tonner reminded mourners, "there aren't supposed to be any bad guys in Paradise."  His voice cracking with emotion, Vancouver Police Chief Jamie Graham said Nitro inspired a special kind of grief. To those who say that Nitro's death was just that of a dog, Chief Graham said that's like saying it's just a husband or just a daughter.  "The stages of grief we feel over the loss of this great animal is not unlike the loss we would feel over the loss of a human partner," he said, as mourners nodded and wiped away tears.  The ceremony included more than 70 dogs paying tribute to Nitro, as their handlers led them to sit briefly in front of the memorial where the canine's badge, collar and urn were on display.  The piper leading the procession was almost drowned out by the barks and howls. Some of the mourners came during their lunch break wearing business suits and work uniforms. One woman carried white lilies with eight dog biscuits tied at the stem. More than 50 of the mourners purchased a $20 DVD about Nitro's life, which included images of his puppy days and a slow-motion montage of him running in a field.  Lorraine Mitchell, whose Rottweiler-shepherd mix, Moose, died three years ago, had tears in her eyes as she watched the procession pass on Burrard Street.  "I know there are some people who would think it is ridiculous to have this," she said. "But it's sad and real to many people, and it's a good thing that we can be so touched by a living being."  Nitro is being mourned not just as a pet, but as a police officer, said Stanley Coren, a University of British Columbia psychology professor who has written extensively about dogs.  Prof. Coren believes that is because Nitro represented more than an officer and a pet when he died in the line of duty.  "This is a dog whose name we happen to know because he did something we all know our dogs would do for us, protecting us for no other reason than because of their loyalty," he said. "This dog suddenly became a dog to make us remember all other dogs."
follow up submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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